Is it possible to earn one lakh or ten lakh / acre / year from farming?


#81

Dear Biju/Mathew,

Thanks a lot for the informative replies. As always in a discussion like this, initial answers lead to further questions. I hope you won’t mind answering these further questions that are sprinkled in the lines below.

I understand from Biju than Ginger, turmeric , yam, cowpea and other shade tolerant species can be grown under mature rubber trees.

Q 1. So if cowpea is grown, can cut fodder be taken from the rubber farm to raise goats/ cattle? After all, raising goats and cattle can de-risk rubber cultivation (Since I remember cases of Kerala rubber farmers committing suicide in 2002-2003 due to low rubber prices).

I think I am now convinced of the economics which holds so long as the price of rubber stays at 150+ rs per kg. If like in 2003, it crashes to 30 rs per kg levels, a de-risking strategy might be useful.

I have to admit, I might be wrong about pepper vines on rubber – it’s all from memory - maybe it was betel vine or some other creeper or the rubber farm was not maintained. I did not look for the tapping cuts on those trees, though I think some rain guards and tapping marks were there on some of the other trees in the farm.

As regards rubber inter-cultivation in China, Laos, etc, I guess the lower tree density must be allowing the growth of tea in rubber estates there. However, if as Mathew says, the roots are fine and spread over top soil, then tea plucking activities can damage them. Q 2. I wonder how that is reconciled.

Q 3. Mathew, I am not sure, but I think rubber is a tap root tree. Hence how is there many roots on the top soil? Is it because of the practice of spreading manure between four trees that the rubber tree is forced to grow side-ways roots to reach the manure/fertilizer?

Q 4. Can Biju/Mathew elaborate if you have seen or heard of double row planting in rubber? The robber board guidelines of 28 x 10 feet (8.75 m x 3 m) for inter-cultivation of cocoa seems to lend credence to the practice of wide single row planting, which in practice can be applied as double row planting too (Since in other agro-forestry guidelines, wide single row plantings can be made more resource-efficient with double row planting).

Q 5. Can Biju/Mathew also tell us about mahogany border planting? I believe it is done with the intention to provide wind-break for rubber trees and also as a de-risking strategy.

Q 6. So does rubber tree density reduce from the ideal 180-200 trees/acre because of mahogany trees planted on border with 10 feet interspacing?

Thanks and regards

Shaji


#82

Q 1. So if cowpea is grown, can cut fodder be taken from the rubber farm to raise goats/ cattle? After all, raising goats and cattle can de-risk rubber cultivation (Since I remember cases of Kerala rubber farmers committing suicide in 2002-2003 due to low rubber prices).

mathew: you can some extend of green fodder from rubber plantation. only thing you have to cut the grass and feed RUbber planation is mono cultivation and risk of cultivation should be proportionate. if you have 10acere land never ever cultivate all 10acere with rubber.  however chance for carshing rubber price to the level of Rs 30/kg is very very less. 1st of all rubber is in commodity market now and there are lots of hedging done, secondly demand for natural rubber increase every day. However the worst and most challange in rubber plantation in labour. Days are not too far number of planation become idal due to labour shortage just like people abandended tea gardens in east

I think I am now convinced of the economics which holds so long as the price of rubber stays at 150+ rs per kg. If like in 2003, it crashes to 30 rs per kg levels, a de-risking strategy might be useful.

I have to admit, I might be wrong about pepper vines on rubber – it’s all from memory - maybe it was betel vine or some other creeper or the rubber farm was not maintained. I did not look for the tapping cuts on those trees, though I think some rain guards and tapping marks were there on some of the other trees in the farm.

As regards rubber inter-cultivation in China, Laos, etc, I guess the lower tree density must be allowing the growth of tea in rubber estates there. However, if as Mathew says, the roots are fine and spread over top soil, then tea plucking activities can damage them. Q 2. I wonder how that is reconciled.

MATHEW : YES IN SOME PART OF KERALA SPECIALLY HILLY ARE TEA GARDEN HAS INTERCROPPED IN RUBBER. HOWEVER TEA IS NOT GROWN IN ALL PLACE OF RUBBER.  I DO NOT HAVE ANY IDEA TO LINK TEA CULTIVATION TO YEILD OF RUBBER. Better if you could check with rubber board.

Q 3. Mathew, I am not sure, but I think rubber is a tap root tree. Hence how is there many roots on the top soil? Is it because of the practice of spreading manure between four trees that the rubber tree is forced to grow side-ways roots to reach the manure/fertilizer?

Mathew: Yes it is tap root tree. however there are many roots on the top soil and it is very necessary too. seen that damages to small roots spread on top soil reduce yeild of latex

MATHEW :

Q 4. Can Biju/Mathew elaborate if you have seen or heard of double row planting in rubber? The robber board guidelines of 28 x 10 feet (8.75 m x 3 m) for inter-cultivation of cocoa seems to lend credence to the practice of wide single row planting, which in practice can be applied as double row planting too (Since in other agro-forestry guidelines, wide single row plantings can be made more resource-efficient with double row planting).

MATHEW :  we have done one plot with new variety rubber deviating space suggested by rubber board. ie more density in acere. need to wait till more 3 years to understand whether it was good or not. however growth is restricteed.

Q 5. Can Biju/Mathew also tell us about mahogany border planting? I believe it is done with the intention to provide wind-break for rubber trees and also as a de-risking strategy.

mathew: do not have exact figures. however can do maximum in border. and ensure to do proper proning .

Q 6. So does rubber tree density reduce from the ideal 180-200 trees/acre because of mahogany trees planted on border with 10 feet interspacing?

mathew : no becuase that space/distance can be calculated from border too,. its basically depend on geography of yoru land

I would suggest, please viist model planation of rubber board and visit some farms . Rubber board is doing a great job in expanding plantation and they are very supportive in every aspects.

thds
mathew


#83

Mathew, you beat me to it. :slight_smile:

Shaji, Instead of Mahagony, why don’t you think of Nutmeg on the borders. The budded plants should start yielding around the 5th year and gradually increase over the years. With the current market rate of Nutmeg and Mace, it should be economical.
Cultivation practice is of Nutmeg is some what similar to Rubber trees, in the sense, spraying of bordeaux mix and application of organic manures etc.

Regards
Biju


#84

Dear Biju,

hmmmm but some one benefited. … Regarding nut meg on border of rubber plantation. please check once again. in my experience growth of nut mug in compare with rubber is less, so once rubber grown after 2-3 years,  due to shades growth of nut mug may suppressed and less yield may be less. Nut mug need moderate sunlight, and shades in summer and plenty of water.  if you can share your experience of nut meg growing with good yeild on border, please share it would be very nice information to apply in our plantation…

rgds
mathew


#85

Hi Mathew, As you rightly pointed out, Rubber trees will expand their canopy in around 3 years. That is why it is advised to do intercrop only in the first 3 years. But having Nutmeg or any other crop/tree on the edges boundaries will not cause any issue related to shade/natural resources (provided you are judicious abt the spacing). Nutmug doesn’t require whole lot of sunshine and it should thrive if planted in boundaries. I have seen this in Idukki district while on a roadtrip.
As well in my native we grow pepper (allow it to climb on trees that are planted on boundaries on the rubber plantation).

Thanks
Biju


#86

Dear Mathew / Biju,

Thank you for your answers.

The reason for my recent interest in rubber is that I have been offered some land suitable for rubber near Dodamarg / Sawantwadi in Maharashtra for about 3l+ rs an acre. As rubber land in Kerala is way way above this and also since similar land in Karnataka coastal belt is also above 7l+ an acre, I am thinking seriously of taking up this offer.

My queries were therefore to know more about rubber agro-practices apart from what I learned from malayali circles and Rubber Board. Queries about intercropping were more to understand any strategies to de-risk dependence from rubber returns.

Another query in this line is this: If mahogany / nutmeg is planted and pepper is trailed on them, then what number of trees can be planted? An acquaintance of mine in Kannur who has planted turmeric under his trees has also planted mahogany / other varieties at a rate of 150 around every two acres, i.e. one block.

Rgds

Shaji


#87

Shaji, Nutmegs should be planted 8-9 meters apart. Not sure abt Mahagony.

Regards
Biju


#88

Dear Shaji

its very nice you are getting similar type property in MH. However just double ensure legal issues/aspects in buying land in konkan (adivasi belt) region. And most important issue about labor after 7 years. Rubber board is aggressively researching for automatic tapping devises but till then labour for tapping is highly challengable. today itself tapping labour is big challenge.

also please talk to rubber board for suitability of land and climate in MH for rubber. Rubber board is already planted rubber trees in MH Gujarat boarder and in study. so any information if you can get for successful farming in MH land, please share with us.

rgds
mathew


#89

hello all

info regarding nutmeg cultivation from TNAU

agritech.tnau.ac.in/farm_innovat … utmug.html

madhavi


#90

Mr Mathew,

I know atleast two plantations about 10-20 years in Konkan.

One is Deepti plantations of about 80-100 acres around Dodamarg area in which rubber is being tapped for last 4-6 years.

Second is in Dapoli University where a trial plot of Rubber Board is completing about 15+ years. dbskkv.org/research/research_ora_rupl.html

commodityonline.com/news/str … 39914.html

In mh-guj border, I think they are growing trials of Parthenium argentatum, a different species from hevea braselinenis, the common rubber tree.

financialexpress.com/news/na … n/973648/0

Thank you

Ray


#91

Mr. Madhu,

Sorry for wrong salutation.I didnt think before addressing you. 

I do not have information about Kollegal and it does not look like Konkan area where i am native. It looks like interior Maharashtra region, dry and high altitude. You go to the local KVK there to find out which species grow well. They will recommend cultivars and varieties which are suited for local diseases, drought conditions and low humidity. I think sugarcane and mulberry might be useful choices. But before doing anything, make sure you are water assured in a sustainable way.

I and my relative do not know much about natural farming or organic farming. We have not seen anyone do it but from this forum and other internet, I understand Fukoka, Sane, and other people practice it.

You said yu cannot focus 24/7 on your farm. But my advice is you must spend some time, atleast 2-3 visits every month to your farm to see what is happening. Failure to do so will lead to neglect by farmhands and destruction of efforts. In some other topic I read about one person asking for webcamera and other such things for seeing the farm from home in city. I dont know whether these are fully available and functional, but one of my friends who works in Middle East had another system. He used to pay the local photo studio shop some money to every day take three photos of his farm from different angles and email to him. I think he was paying him about 1,500  or 2,500 rupees per month, but I am not sure. Even if you do agroforestry, please visit your farm every week as it takes theives only a few hours to cut down a 20 year old tree and transport it away to another district. Our family experienced it. We lost over 20 trees of 15 years and older in one day.

If you are from USA or Canada, why dont you try farming there. I heard that good quality farmland is available for 8,000 dollars an acre and titles in USA are very reliable. (You can also get insurance against faulty title) In the USA, you will have more access and connection to farm marketing which is biggest problem of agriculture in India, apart from joint system of land ownership. If you want to do agroforestry in Inida, try it first in USA in about 10-15 acres. USA is one of leaders in agroforestry. They plant almost 750 trees per acre and get sizezble quantity of timber and biomass.

Since you are Canadian citizen did you you buy land in india in your own name or is it relative’s land? I know that NRI’s and foreigners cannot buy farm land in India. 

Myself, I am a farming enthusiast. I have land about 7.5 acres, (in bits and peices from 0.14 to 0.5 hectares) but cultivated by relatives. I get 6-10 bags rice every year, some coconuts, some groundnuts sacks plus some 10-15,000 rupees per annum. Sometimes more, most times less. Between all realtives in my family, we own about 3000 acres of land but nobody has single title to any one peice.  Our lands lie fallow because of joint ownership system. Nobody wants to spend time, effort and money because if there is profit everybody wants to share, but if there is loss, then nobody wants to share. Also new idea, everybody does not agree to try and see. So our family and village is not very rich because nobody will work on the joint land and not everybody will not agree to sell.

I am interested in agriculture and am trying to bring some change in my family. Some people in family are with me, but most not interetsed and only want to migrate to nearby cities/towns by selling land for very high price. But there is nobody to buy at price they want. In the meantime, nobody cultivate land as whoever cultivates it will have to share profit but not losses.

Most of information put by me here is from my relative and some friends and distant friends. My relative is actual farmer and he has done courses in agriculture university in Dapoli. He retired early as Field Worker in Dapoli University due to accident. He has about 6-7 acres of land (in one peice) that he bought from other family members. However, he is old now and only one of his four sons interested in agriculture.

Many of the ideas mentioned earlier, we cannot do as we do not have enough money to wait for long term crops.

Thank you


#92

As the saying goes nothing in life comes easy ;D

faidelhi.org/Article%20-Dr%2 … x-page.htm

The above sucess stories in the link should keep us all motivated.

SUCCESS STORIES OF INDIAN FARMERS
  Title State Crop
A Success Story of an AP Farmer  Andhra Pradesh Rice, Mango, Mosambi
Success Stories of Papaya Farmers  Sholapur district (Maharashtra) Jalpaiguri district (West Bengal) Papaya
Cultivation of Medicinal Plant  West Bengal
Maharashtra
Aloevera and Drumstick 
National Agriculture Related Policies - Success Story of a U.P. Farmer  Uttar Pradesh Rice and wheat
Farming System Approach to Improve IUE, Employment and Income in Eastern India Assam, Bihar, Orissa and West Bengal Field crop : rice, maize, rice bean Multistoried cropping: Coconut, ginger, turmeric, pine apple, banana, papaya
Vegetables: brinjal, okra, potato,
tomato etc.
Floriculture
Fishery, Poultry, Duckery
Mushroom
Apiary
Biogas

High Density Planting : Success Stories of Banana Farmers Tamil Nadu Banana
System of Rice Intensification
Success Stories of Farmers Andhra Pradesh
Tamil Nadu Rice
Poverty Alleviation Through Grass Root Based Planning and Execution of Vegetable Farming System: An Experience of HP Farmers Himachal Pradesh Cabbage
Cauliflower
Fertigation in High Tech Agriculture
A Success Story of A Lady Farmer Maharashtra Capsicum
Landmarks in Agriculture and Fertiliser in India
THE SUCCESS STORY OF A UTTARAKHAND FARMER Uttarakhand Sugarcane
Revolution in Mango Production
Success Stories of Some Farmers Various States Mango

Regards,
Madhukali


#93

I don’t know why so much only discussion for only one lakh/year/acre.It is a child’s play.
I will show you in the field.Come and assess yourself.  Yes it is very easy if you know  agriculture.

Who are realy interested please come to one of my operational place in vicinity to kolkata and  withot huge investment are earning .
You have to make a trip,and for the IT people i  i remind you that IT and BT(biotechnology) is the answer.
If you to cultivate contact  me  :dg_sabujayan@yyahoo.com
Thanks
DG


#94

Hello DG,

For the sake of all the members of this forum, do you mind sharing your farming methodologies as well as elaborate what you mean by “IT and BT is the answer” (i.e how you have incorporated these in your farm)?

Thanks
Biju


#95

Hi?
Please let me know when should I book my ticket to come and see your agriculture wonders in your farm?


#96

yes i agree with u . it is quite ammusing to read the question and answers on making money. Agriculture is a noble profession on which the entire human race is dependent for survival.


#97

Dear Mr.Swamy and Mr.Biju :
So far i remember Mr.Murli have started this topic who is no more with us,let us pray to God to rest his soul in peace.

We must try to fulfil his desire to acieve one lakh per acre per anum.
By this time I like to point out to mr.swamy that only seeing the field able to perform much better than one lakh would not meet the purpose.I will show you severl crops like chilli,papaya,cabbage,bottle gourd.You have to assess the harvest and know the local whole sale market price to find out the output per harvest.

As for example,say papaya(Green) is harvested at 15 to 20 days interval.I will show you  1/3rd of an acre is yielding arround 500kg/hervest. and the present market price is arround Rs.500-600/quintal.As in the winter season the yield go slow down we will keep this productivity almost to the same tune with bio technology(BT) when in the winter months and early summer the price of papaya will reach as high as Rs.2000-2500/quintal for few months.

Nextis bottle gourd,in this case harvesting is twice  a week.I will show you 1/3  of an acre is yielding arround 300-400pcs. of fruits with a wholesale price of Rs.10/fruit and bottle gourd is almost a six months duration crop.

You  can also see the  other crops like banana which is with high density planting accomodate  1200 plants per acre is ready with selable bunch which are now selling at Rs.200/bunch,though now the price is on lower side.Moreover,you have to give a look to the other vegetables lke cabbage,cauliflower,knol khol,broad beans etc.etc.
Again , if you interested to see the open sky flower cultivation you can visit rose,tuberose,marigold fields to asses the imens possibilities of  proper horticulture.

You have to plan properly to observe the total things how we have planned our cropping patterns according to our climatic and market trend to fetch good returnes
from the fields.So that you have to do it as per your local situation and market demand.
My residential experience in karnataka reveals that vegetable prices are much more than West Bengal and possibilities are more.

So,please plan properly how and when you are comming to see my cultivators fields,but keep in the mind it could be seen with a radious of almost 50 km span.

Thanks,
DG


#98

DG,
People from abroad coming to my farm to study the agriculture note it.

Where you got this knowledge to reply in such lengthy words?
Your own knowledge is also a copy from others experience/books/lessons etc please note.
If you restrict yourself to not to meet/share knowledge with others than it is nothing but “koopmanduka” version.

You are going away from one acre concept, first you study the whole thread to know better to prepare your reply.
Where are you accommodating all crops you mentioned in one acre papaya crop is standing now?

I have accommodated Papaya, Mango, Jambu Nerale, Coconut, Silver Oak, Curry leafs, bitter gourd & others in 1 acre.
If you achieving the figures, then come up with photos and exact figures without giving general statements.

Still you have not reached other stage of Agriculture to get benefit more and your ideas are rounding within the combination of cultivations in more extent than one acre. It may not be difficult to enhance more extent of land  if you will be able fix mixed crops within Only ONE ACRE.
I think you have not touched about how to market your product for higher prices directly to consumer by eliminating hurdles in present marketing system.

Bye the bye I travel to teach interested people in different locations  to meet achievers and also to share my knowledge with them. If you are learned everything within your land or books, than nothing to do for my with your concept.
Come up with idea to generate more than 1 lakh in ONLY ONE ACRE.
Doing all crops in more extent is different than One acre concept. Stick on to subject matter and come up with results.





#99

Relax guys,  keep it on topic and don’t get personal.


#100

Another story of a farmer making Rs. 1 Lakh / acre was posted by farmnest member ‘gunda’ in another thread. He too is practicing integrated natural farming using Subhash palekar’s method.

You can read about him in page 6-8 of this PDF or watch the two videos below.

youtube.com/watch?v=zUI1PI-YgC0

youtube.com/watch?v=ON5B0mgWWxk

Again, a lesson for farmers believing in “modern”, “scientific” farming methods promoted by agri universities.