Do we still need proof that Natural Farming has good yield

Hello everybody,

I have gone through a lot of natural farming, organic farming, chemical farming blogs discussion. Here is what I have to say.

For last 4 months I am trying to do Natural Farming and the kind of growth I have seen for my vegetable plants with complete natural farming are much more than I have expected here is the link of my post http://www.rameshwari.com/2012/09/do-we-still-need-proof-that-natural.html.

It goes without saying that I have not put any chemical fertilizer, pesticides, not tilled the land, no cultivation, ploughing etc. No modern techniques have been used.

Simply, trench and mulch. Anyone interested to know more, I will be very happy to share all the info and help required.

Wanted to share with all of you for your comments and suggestions.

[quote="rameshwari"]
Hello everybody,

I have gone through a lot of natural farming, organic farming, chemical farming blogs discussion. Here is what I have to say.

For last 4 months I am trying to do Natural Farming and the kind of growth I have seen for my vegetable plants with complete natural farming are much more than I have expected here is the link of my post http://www.rameshwari.com/2012/09/do-we-still-need-proof-that-natural.html.

It goes without saying that I have not put any chemical fertilizer, pesticides, not tilled the land, no cultivation, ploughing etc. No modern techniques have been used.

Simply, trench and mulch. Anyone interested to know more, I will be very happy to share all the info and help required.

Wanted to share with all of you for your comments and suggestions.

[/quote] You have simplified your agriCULTURE in to TRUNH & MULCH. Now start only through MULCH to  grow golden crops in your land.
Those who are crying for agriculture difficulties should open their eyes to know simplified agriculture from your experience, wishing you all the best.

Hi Sheo,

First let me clarify… I am a firm believer and dreamer of +ve ness farming lifestyle.

I congratulate you on your efforts and experimentation spirits.

Idont mean to be a party pooper here.But ,I think your challenge is quiet premature …

1). Good yield doesn’t mean getting 1 kg of bhendi or 2 kg of bhendi . Sustainable profits as a result of the practices.The profits that can support a family or family with the yields. (show a +ve figure from (Output revenue - Input Costs ) . Yes I wont write off  satisfaction or heavenly tastes. At the same time they are not the sole purpose of farming ,in my opinion.

2). Sustainableyields  does not  come with just produce in the farm,but comes with succesfully marketing the produce.Otherwise it will only fetch paper profits.

In my opinion,Whether its natural or chemical farming ,attaining sustainability is important.So that farmer can support his family with the chosen lifestyle or profession.

youtube.com/watch?v=7XyPLy1JwfM

I wish to see you setting a example for all the Internet farming enthusiasts.

Please take my opionion with positive spirit.

Sreeram

Thanks Swamy.

Thanks natureworx too for your response, valid point. I appreciate your response.

If you notice here natureworx, I have mentioned about good yield and not talking about sustainability. Its just 4 months of my trial and sustainability doesn’t come in 4 months anywhere in any business.

My point here is only good yield when you compare with chemical farming. For me, the progress of my vegetables plants are as good or even better than chemical farming without giving any chemical fertilizer or pesticides. This is what I want to highlight here.

Initially I noticed that some insects were eating my plants leaves (watch this video youtube.com/watch?v=J2bkJ665VPw).  Initially people started suggesting me to spray pesticides etc. I had option to spray organic pesticides etc. but I left it as it is. Of course they have eaten some of the plants completely but now they are on rest.

I have read many such examples and have listed some of the good links about Natural Farming here rameshwari.com/p/useful-links_11.html

I firmly believe that Natural Farming is the way to go and I am committed to that.

As far as sustainability is concerned I am sure I am going to get it as my expenses will be almost zero after one or two years once my farm is established (I can say this based on several practical examples I have read/seen/experienced).

Marketing produce is of course an important point and many websites or community people are coming up with the the direct marketing concept or meeting point of producers and consumer. One such initiative is farmingfunda.com/ dedicated to farming.

Mr. Raju Titus, the guru is also self sustained - rishikheti.blogspot.in/

I agree with Natureworx, Sheo. Had the same thoughts when I read your post though didn’t put them down. What you’re doing is good but it’s premature to call it a successful enterprise yet. Even calling it a good yield is too early. At least wait for the harvest to complete, keep all records of expenses, area allotted to each produce, harvest from that area, sales and so on. Calculate your actual income and then compare notes with a conventional farmer nearby. In all, give yourself 2-3 years, grow multiple crops in different climates, face bigger knocks then you have faced so far, recover and start again and if you’re still farming at the end of the period and achieving comparable or better returns you can pat yourself on the back. Right now is way too early.

Chandra,

Pls advice if the norm on the forum is to paste links or the entire article itself as I have done below. Based on your suggestion will comply going forward.

As this one from my archive is relavent thought I should Share. Apologies those who have already read it but nothing like a refreshing the fundamentals again ???

Cheers,
Madhukali

Thoughts in action are deeds, sprouting seed will become plant/tree.

Hi Madhukali,

Place the quoted content within quote tags (the way I have modified the above post) and add a link to the original source just below the quoted text. Of course, make sure the material is allowed to be quoted.

Chandra

Thanks Madhukali for the wonderful article. :slight_smile:

Looks like the original source of Madhukali’s quote is deccanherald.com/content/173611/

Thanks

One more video and some pics in support of my way of farming - http://www.rameshwari.com/2012/10/lady-finger-grown-natural-farming-way.html

Thanks

Hi Folks,

Nice article on natural farming for the benefit of those who have not read it yet. As it stated in last page about copy rights that we can use for non commercial purpose  I have taken the liberty to attach it.

Special emphasis on the 7 layer Canopy farming, but guess the key is finding local indigenous tress that have acclimatized to the location of the farm. The next most Imp decision if finding those which can grow together and augments each other “Symbiotic relationships” between all the 7 layers in order for the farm to be fully self-sustainable forest fruit garden.

Best Regards,
Madhukali.

Sorry as the attachment excceded permitted size it not go through.

sustainable-farming.blogspot.com/

Pasted link above.

Madhukali

Hi Madhukali,

That link points the blog’s home page.
Can you please give the link to the specific post you are referring to?

Thanks

Hi WhiteClover,

scribd.com/doc/12861937/Natural-Farming

Sure here is the article plus some additional information on The 7 layers I mentioned

The Basics of Permaculture/ Food Forest Gardening
What is Permaculture?
It is a garden design method that seeks to create healthy, sustainable agriculture. The word comes from a mix of “permanent” and “agriculture”. In name it has existed for a few decades, but in practice it probably existed much, much longer.   

Ethics
First it is important to understand the ethics of permaculture. They are simple.

  1. Care for the Earth. It is the only one we have.

  2. Care for people. Permaculture is about creating a sustainable human habitat.

  3. Share the surplus. What we grow should be available to everyone.

Zones
Permaculture is about efficiency. Think of your property in zones.

Zone 0- The house- where you live

Zone 1- Yard and garden- This is where your annual vegetable garden, and herbs should be. Also anything else you need often so it’s close to the house. Everything here requires frequent maintenance or harvesting.

Zone 2- More perrenial plants, compost, and things that need less care.

Zone 3- Crops with minimal maintenance that you will not be using often. Possible things for sale. Also live stock pastures.

Zone 4- semi wild- good place for a food forest, and for getting timber

Zoe 5- The wild- no human intervention here.       

It is up to you to decide what you will have in each zone. Just keep in mind what makes sense for your life style.

Layers
Nature is layered and so should your permaculture food forest. Traditionally there are 7 layers

1- canopy (large fruit and nut trees)

2- low tree layer (dwarf fruit trees)

3- shrub layer ( berries and bushes)

4- herbaceous (low growing vegetables that are annual or perrenial)

5- rhizosphere (root vegetables)

6- soil surface (ground covers, creeping plants)

7-verticle layer (climbers, vines) 

Partnerships
The plants you choose should serve more than one purpose. Preferably they should work together to make each other grow better and give you less work. Use nitrogen fixing plants like legumes near leafy plants that require alot of nitrogen. Use plants that repell pest insects (like tansy, garlic, nasturtium, marigold, and onion) around plants that are susceptable to pests (like brassicas and squash). Many plants grow well together. Simply research “plant guilds” and find out which are good for your area. The Native Americans planted corn, beans, and squash together with much success. 

A Few Tips

  1. Have a rain water collection system. You get free water every storm, dont waste it.

  2. Start acompost pile. Kitchen scraps and yard waste are valuable fertilizer.

  3. Mulch, mulch, and then go mulch somewhere else. It consrves soil moisture and improves soils structure and fertility.

  4. Say no to pesticides and synthetic fertilizers. They are poisons and have no place in a sustainable permaculture garden.

  5. Favor perrenials over annuals. They require less work, and the make permaculture truly permanent.

Cheers,
Madhukali.

BTW which part of town is your farm in and what stage is it in.

Keep the Faith and watch the tress grow… only way out is Farming.:wink:

Thank you.
No, I’m yet to take the plunge :slight_smile:
Got to sort out a few things on personal front.
But also casually checking for lands around Hyderabad. I stay at Kukatpally.
Probably, given my current position, it would be easy for me to join someone than going solo.