Cows for Organic Farming etc

Cow dung is a necessity in the use of traditional organic farming methods and information here on cows/buffaloes mostly focuses on larger-scale dairy farms. I’d hence like to initiate a discussion on the topic and expand knowledge on smaller scale ownership of 2-5 cows.

My questions hover around the following areas:

  1. What are the native breeds available around Hyderabad? Since the purpose of rearing cows in this case is primarily for collection of their dung and urine, what breeds are suitable? What price can one expect to pay?

  2. The few farmers I asked here about their cattle’s breeds had no idea about breed and said their cows were just ‘generic’. Is that the equivalent of a mixed-breed dog, for example, in terms of bloodline?

  3. How many cows (for their dung) are required for a 10 acre lot of land for FYM and/or for Vermicomposting?

  4. For the production of Gobar Gas, how many families (4 members each) will, say, 3 cows sustain?

  5. For feeding, what acreage of fodder will require to be dedicated for the cows?

6.  What are the other feeding options?

  1. How many man-hours/day will be required for the upkeep of these small number of cows?

  2. Generally speaking, what is the availability of dung in rural areas; can it be bought easily or do the farmers use it for their own fields?

  3. How labour intensive will the maintenance of vermicompost pits be?

My thoughts are to rear cows for Organic Farming and Bio-Gas, not necessarily for milk. However, it would be nice to have milk from our own cows and let the caretaker(s) utilize the remaining milk as an incentive.

Please add your questions/answers for the greater good!

Here is a tidbit on yields…however crossbreeds require more attention. i believe.

…Two cross-breed cows generate 6,000 litres of milk annually…

hindu.com/seta/2011/05/12/st … 281800.htm

Dear Sir,
Farmer requires Only ONE Cow for cultivating about 30 acres of land in Natural/Spiritual Farming method.
10kg desi cow dung with 10 liter cow urine in the form of JEEVAMRUTHA once a month itself is enough to make soil fertile for one acre. 30 days dung & Urine for 30 acres.

One gram of desi cow dung contains 300 to 500 crore microorganisms and HF & Jersey cow dung contained 150 to 200 crore microorganisms which can enhance fertility of soil. None of FYM or Chemical fertilizers is food stock for plan roots. 98.5% body of any plant constitutes constituted with carbon dioxide, water and sunlight supplied by the nature.

It is up to the person to have en number of cows/buffaloes for larger-scale dairy farms.
My answers to your questions are the following:

  1. What are the native breeds available around Hyderabad?
    You can check with elderly people in rural areas to know them. Even rates also can be checked with them.

  2. The few farmers I asked here about their cattle’s breeds had no idea about breed and said their cows were just ‘generic’. Is that the equivalent of a mixed-breed dog, for example, in terms of bloodline?
    New entrents to farming have no idea of above points in cattle, only way is to approach elderly people. (One can Recheck of modern life style by neglecting our elder people advices for cattle breeds in this issue and for whole of our life).

  3. How many cows (for their dung) are required for a 10 acre lot of land for FYM and/or for Vermicomposting?
    Only One cow is enough for your 10 acre cultivation with the help of Jeevamrutha, Beejamrutha and other preparations.
    No need of FYM and/or for Vermicomposting.

  4. For the production of Gobar Gas, how many families (4 members each) will, say, 3 cows sustain?
    3 cattle cow dung is enough for production of gobar gas for 4 member family’s kichen needs.

  5. For feeding, what acreage of fodder will require to be dedicated for the cows?
    Five cattle can be managed with the help of fodder grown in One Acre.

6.  What are the other feeding options?

  1. How many man-hours/day will be required for the upkeep of these small number of cows?
    Feeding of cattle for a farmer is negligible work in day-to-day work in agricultural land.

  2. Generally speaking, what is the availability of dung in rural areas; can it be bought easily or do the farmers use it for their own fields?
    It depends on the area & the demand and availability you looking. You should be specific in your location to know exact situation.

  3. How labour intensive will the maintenance of vermicompost pits be?
    I suggest you to know the above 8 points first to know answer to 9th question.

Iam sure that with the help of one or two cows your farming and drinking milk will do, if you want cow dung for bio gas, then add another 3 to 4 cows additionally.

Dear Mr. Swamy,

Thank you so much for your detailed reply.

The farmers I spoke with about breeds were ‘true’ farmers, but yet, their lack of knowledge about breeds was disconcerting.

How does Jeevamrutha differ from Panchagavya?

Here is the recipe for jivamrita… I think its palekars method based on his concept ZBNF/ZBSF

palekarzerobudgetspiritualfarmin … mrita.aspx

As for panchagavya…it has many flavors, depending on the region. It can be found on Youtube…hindu online archives on agriculture topics etc

Hi?
The information about cattle you got from farmers is true, further more can be ascertained from other farmers if you meet them.
It will be better for you to know the differences between Jeevamrutha and Panchagavya practically.